Communism Dead in Cuba

Castro admits that communism isn’t working so well in Cuba, as Red China moves towards the market place to create the worlds largest economy. Meanwhile here at home Obama, Reid and Pelosi have nationalized our banks, financial institutions, automobile industries and healthcare.

Communism has been proclaimed dead more than once in the past couple of decades. But today, it’s safe to say, it is really dead. Irreversibly dead. Cemetery dead.

Consider this comment from a knowledgeable Cuban critic who was asked if the country’s brand of socialism, created by Fidel Castro after his 1959 revolution, could be of use in other countries: “The Cuban model doesn’t even work for us anymore.” That remark would have gotten him in trouble with authorities, if his name were not Fidel Castro.

There may yet be admirers of Cuban communism in certain precincts of Berkeley or Cambridge, but it’s hard to find them in Havana. The 84-year-old Fidel (who later said he didn’t mean to say that) has turned control over to brother Raul, whose faith in the shining power of Marxism-Leninism has also dried up.

This week, the regime said it will dismiss 500,000 people from government jobs, which account for 84 percent of the work force. Reflecting ruefully on the perils of sheltered bureaucracy, Raul Castro declared recently, “We have to erase forever the notion that Cuba is the only country in the world where one can live without working.”

As a blanket indictment, that statement is grossly unfair. Many Cuban government employees put in long hours—working in the black market.

We rush towards a more socialized economy as everyone with real experience with socialism backs away.  Mean while we give our whole economy away to China and continue to boycott Cuba, apparently because they are such a threat to our security and our way of life.

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